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Smoky Cigarettes Places Increases High Blood Pressure Risk, Bad For Heart

Everything is fair in fashion. Selfie on the rooftop, riding a bike with one or no hand or start smoking cigarettes to let people know that you have swag. After all, Swag is not about what you want people to think about you, its already knowing what they think about you. Cigarettes can be called fashion of this epoch. Playing cigarettes is smart and not un-smart, so many people now. Everyone is eating cigarettes regardless of the children. Whether we think about consuming cigarettes, it is known that cigarettes harm the human body. However, we do not know exactly how to do damage. Cigarettes do not destroy anyone one day. As age progresses, it is gradually getting worse.

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Exposure to secondhand smoke may be bad for your heart and overall health as it increases the risk of developing high blood pressure, according to research. “Avoid exposure to secondhand smoke regardless of whether the smoker is still in the room,” said Professor Byung Jin Kim from Sungkyunkwan University in South Korea.

“Our study in non-smokers shows that the risk of high blood pressure (hypertension) is higher with longer duration of passive smoking but even the lowest amounts are dangerous,” Kim said in a statement.

Passive smoking at home or work was linked with a 13 percent increased risk of hypertension. Living with a smoker after age 20 was associated with a 15 percent greater risk, researchers said.

Exposure to passive smoking for ten years or more was related to a 17 percent increased risk of hypertension. Men and women were equally affected. Participants with hypertension were significantly more likely to be exposed to secondhand smoke at home or work (27.9 percent) than those with normal blood pressure (22.6 percent).

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Hypertension was significantly more common in people exposed to passive smoke at home or work (7.2 percent) compared to no exposure (5.5 percent). High blood pressure is the leading global cause of premature death, accounting for almost ten million deaths in 2015, and those affected are advised to quit smoking.

Previous research has suggested a link between passive smoking and hypertension in non-smokers. However, most studies were small, restricted to women, and used self-reported questionnaires in which respondents typically over-report never-smoking.

The study also found that approximately 5.5 trillion cigarettes were made every year, and about 1.1 billion people smoke cigarettes. That’s a pretty large number. Of these, about 100 percent of all cigarette smoking in Asia is 44 percent male and 4 percent in Asia. Cigarette consumption in women is about 46 percent of men and 26 percent of women in Europe. It is about 35 and 22 percent in America. But like the cigarette epidemic in the western ocean region. About 60 percent of men and 8 percent of women are addicted to smokes.

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This is the first large study to assess the association between secondhand smoke and hypertension in never-smokers verified by urinary levels of cotinine, the principal metabolite of nicotine.

It included 131,739 never-smokers, one-third men, and an average age of 35 years.

“The results suggest that it is necessary to keep completely away from secondhand smoke, not just reduce exposure, to protect against hypertension,” said Kim. “While efforts have been made around the world to minimize the dangers of passive smoking by expanding no smoking areas in public places, our study shows that more than one in five never-smokers are still exposed to secondhand smoke.

“Stricter smoking bans are needed, together with more help for smokers to kick the habit. Knowing that family members suffer should be extra motivation for smokers to quit,” he said.

In case if you’re still not able to leave smoking after knowing these all side effects, probably you’re… “I tried to stop smoking cigarettes by telling myself I just didn’t want to smoke, but I didn’t believe myself”

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