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Heavy Plus Tall Kids Has Higher Risk Of Kidney Cancer Says The Study

Heavier and taller children may be at an increased risk of developing kidney cancer as adults, a study has found. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common form of kidney cancer found in adults. Although it often occurs in men between the ages of 50 and 70, cancer can be diagnosed throughout adulthood.

First of all, learn about the kind of fats:


Unsaturated fats: These are found in plant foods and fish. These fats are good for heart health, especially when they’re used in place of saturated and trans fats. Unsaturated fats are found in salmon, avocados, olives, and walnuts, and vegetable oils like soybean, corn, canola, and olive oil.

Saturated fats: These fats are found in meat and other animal products, such as butter and cheese. Saturated fats are also in palm and coconut oils, which are often used in baked goods you buy at the store. Eating too much-saturated fat can raise blood cholesterol levels and increase the chance of getting heart disease.

Trans fats: These fats are found in stick margarine. Trans fats are also found in certain foods that you buy at the store or get in a restaurant, such as snack foods, cookies and cakes, and fried foods. When you see “hydrogenated” or “partially hydrogenated” oils on an ingredient list, the food contains trans fats. Trans fats are also listed on the food label. Like saturated fats, trans fats can raise cholesterol and increase the chance of getting heart disease.


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Medical experts do not know the exact causes of RCC. “We know that overweight in adulthood is associated with an increased risk of RCC. We also know that cancers take many years to develop,” said Britt Wang Jensen, from the Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital in Denmark. “We, therefore, had a theory that already being overweight in childhood would increase the risk of RCC later in life,” Jensen said in a statement.

To tease out the relationships between childhood body size and the risk of RCC in adulthood, researchers used data from 301,422 children born in Copenhagen in the years 1930 to 1985. The weights and heights were measured at annual school health examinations at the ages 7-13 years.

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During about 32 years of observation, 1,010 individuals (680 men) were diagnosed with RCC. Among men and women significant and positive associations were observed between childhood BMI and height, respectively, and RCC risk.

When comparing two 13-year old children with one z-score difference in BMI – equivalent to 5.9 kg for boys and 6.8 kg for girls – but with similar height, the heaviest child had a 14 percent higher risk of RCC than the leaner child.

For height, one z-score difference in two 13-year old children was associated with a 12 percent increased risk of RCC later in life for the taller boy or girl. “We have found in other studies that childhood height is positively associated with several cancer forms. Therefore, we did expect to find that all children have a higher risk of RCC than average-sized children,” researchers said. “Our findings that heavier and taller children have increased risks of RCC opens the door to new ways to explore the causes of kidney cancer,” they said.

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Fat is as essential to your diet as protein and carbohydrates are in fueling your body with energy. Certain bodily functions also rely on the presence of fat. For example, some vitamins require fat in order to dissolve into your bloodstream and provide nutrients. However, the excess calories from eating too much fat of any type can lead to weight gain, according to Stanford Hospital and Clinics.

Take care of your child! “A fit, healthy body – that is the best fashion statement.”, said by an author, Jess C. Scott.

The trouble with always trying to preserve the health of the body is that it is so difficult to do without destroying the health of the mind.

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